Brian vs Brad

Discussion in 'Undergraduate Math' started by wrdeever, Dec 25, 2010.

  1. wrdeever

    wrdeever Guest

    You are correct. It is Dr BRAD Osgood. The good Dr's material (but
    not, unfortunately, his attempts at humor) is excellent, but the
    recording quality leaves much to be desired. Along about the fourth or
    fifth lecture, the cameraman goes to sleep and an entire board of
    equations goes permanently missing. He is also a bit late panning to
    the current board in some of the other lectures and several lectures
    have such problems with lighting that only the chalked material is--
    barely--visible. But you can follow it quite well just from the audio
    and the notes.
     
    wrdeever, Dec 25, 2010
    #1
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  2. wrdeever

    Stan Brown Guest

    Please don't change the subject line when posting a follow-up. Thank
    you!
     
    Stan Brown, Dec 25, 2010
    #2
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  3. I don't think the problem is just that that the subject line has been
    changed; rather it's a whole new post. The OP seems to have started two
    new threads, both of which should be branches of your "Integrating
    exp(-x^2)" question.

    [I know your original question has been answered, but the way we did it
    was to note that

    int exp(-x^2) dx * int exp(-y^2) dy

    = int exp(-x^2)exp(-y^2) dx dy

    = int exp(-(x^2 + y^2)) dx dy

    and then change to polar co-ordinates.

    I think it was done in first year probability and statistics; but
    Jacobians and general transformations of integrals 'twixt different
    co-ordinate systems would have come in the second year, so I fancy that
    2D Cartesian to polar was done as a special case just to do that
    integral (or a close relative) in connection with the normal
    distribution.]
     
    Frederick Williams, Dec 26, 2010
    #3
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