Geometry and Topology: paper 23 withdrawn, paper 24 published

Discussion in 'Math Research' started by Geometry and Topology Journal, Nov 28, 2003.

  1. Geometry and Topology, Volume 7 (2003) Paper no. 23 has been withdrawn.

    ---

    The following paper has been published:

    Geometry and Topology, Volume 7 (2003) Paper no. 24, pages 789--797

    URL:
    http://www.maths.warwick.ac.uk/gt/GTVol7/paper24.abs.html

    Title:
    Hyperbolic cone-manifolds with large cone-angles

    Author(s):
    Juan Souto

    Abstract:

    We prove that every closed oriented 3-manifold admits a hyperbolic cone-manifold structure with cone-angle arbitrarily close to 2pi.

    AMS Classification Numbers. Primary: 57M50
    Secondary: 30F40, 57M60

    Keywords:
    Hyperbolic cone-manifold, Kleinian groups

    Received: 3 June 2003
    Accepted: 13 November 2003
    Published: 28 November 2003

    Proposed: Jean-Pierre Otal
    Seconded: David Gabai, Benson Farb

    Author(s) address(es):
    Mathematisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn
    Beringstr. 1, 53115 Bonn, Germany
    Email: -bonn.de
    URL: http://www.math.uni-bonn.de/people/souto
     
    Geometry and Topology Journal, Nov 28, 2003
    #1
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  2. ``Geometry and Topology, Volume 7 (2003) Paper no. 23 has been withdrawn.''

    I don't understand. What does it mean for a published journal article---
    or a book, or any other document declared to be part of the permanent
    research literature---to be ``withdrawn''?

    Is the published paper still available from its supposedly permanent
    home on the web? I glanced at the Geometry and Topology web page; the
    answer seems to be ``no.'' If the 2003 Geometry and Topology papers had
    already been printed and distributed to libraries, would the publishers
    now be contacting the librarians, asking them to burn that volume?

    I see a clear line between permanent documents and temporary documents.
    A permanent document is a legitimate target of a bibliography entry; a
    temporary document isn't. A temporary document might not be available to
    the future reader. The only safe way to cite a temporary document is to
    repeat what it says. Evidently, despite Geometry and Topology's claims
    to be a legitimate journal, its papers are temporary. This bothers me.

    ---D. J. Bernstein, Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics,
    Statistics, and Computer Science, University of Illinois at Chicago
     
    D. J. Bernstein, Dec 1, 2003
    #2
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  3. Geometry and Topology Journal

    Lee Rudolph Guest

    The G&T website is only *one* "home on the web" for the paper;
    it was, and is, also at the arXiv, math.GT/0311282. If I
    understand the arXiv's rules correctly (and, if I do not, I
    am sure someone knowledgeable will correct me), the version
    still available there will continue to be available there, even
    if and when later versions (including a possible complete r
    retraction, I suppose) are also available there, so marked.
    Perhaps we are to understand "withdrawn" as applying to the
    _imprimatur_ of G&T. (Even if we are, I'm not sure that answers
    your objection.)

    Lee Rudolph
     
    Lee Rudolph, Dec 2, 2003
    #3
  4. Geometry and Topology Journal

    tchow Guest

    Yes; for example, a paper that was advertised on this newsgroup a few
    years ago (cs.CC/0004009) was withdrawn, but you can still get the
    original version.

    I agree with Dan that it's irritating when a supposedly permanent
    document becomes unavailable. The ArXiv's approach seems to be a
    good one for permanent electronic documents (though I still think
    of the ArXiv as primarily a *preprint* server, and maybe preprints
    should be allowed to be temporary).
     
    tchow, Dec 3, 2003
    #4
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