Unusual notation

Discussion in 'Undergraduate Math' started by khosaa, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. khosaa

    khosaa Guest

    Hi,

    I came across a notation in the text "Mathematical Analysis" by Malik
    I can't recall ever seeing. It seems he is defining a function using a
    symbol which is like a "left corner", i.e. |__ , so f(x) = |__ where
    the argument, x, is on top of the underscore. Since I can't write a
    letter with an underscore here, I'll write f(x) = (|__)(x). In neither
    the appendices or introduction does he appear to define this notation.

    This is in a section about sequences (pg 83, to be specific), where
    Malik is defining the members of a sequence {a_n} as :

    a_n = ( |__ )(3n) / [(|__)(n)]^3 where n is a natural number.

    I'd say it was something like a floor function, but this wouldn't make
    any sense in the context of this problem since all of the quantities
    he is considering are integers.

    Thnaks,
    Fran
     
    khosaa, Mar 4, 2011
    #1
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  2. khosaa

    Ray Vickson Guest

    I saw in a late 19th Century algebra book the notation you cite as an
    alternate to the factorial notation; that is, |_(n) = n! in modern
    notation.

    R.G. Vickson
     
    Ray Vickson, Mar 4, 2011
    #2
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