Working With Sets...5

Discussion in 'Algebra' started by nycmathguy, Jun 24, 2022.

  1. nycmathguy

    nycmathguy

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    College Algebra
    Chapter 1/Section 1
    Review

    IMG_20220624_164401.jpg

    IMG_20220624_164505.jpg
     
    nycmathguy, Jun 24, 2022
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  2. nycmathguy

    MathLover1

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    note:

    • is Union: is in either set or both sets
    • is Intersection: only in both sets
    • is Difference: in one set but not the other
    A difference is wrong, doesn't have element 9: A difference={0,2,6,7,8}

    B difference ={0,1,3,5,9}

    A ∪ B− ={0.1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9}
     
    MathLover1, Jun 24, 2022
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  3. nycmathguy

    nycmathguy

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    No. A with line over it means the complement of set A. Same with B.
     
    nycmathguy, Jun 24, 2022
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  4. nycmathguy

    MathLover1

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    yes, the complement or difference is same
     
    MathLover1, Jun 24, 2022
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  5. nycmathguy

    nycmathguy

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    Isn't the complement of any set the elements in the Universal Set not found in a given set?

    For example, the complement of set A (also expressed A^(c)) means all the elements in the Universal Set U not found in set A. No?
     
    nycmathguy, Jun 25, 2022
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  6. nycmathguy

    MathLover1

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    yes
    The complement of set A is defined as a set that contains the elements present in the universal set but not in set A. For example, Set U = {2,4,6,8,10,12} and set A = {4,6,8}, then the complement of set A, A^(c)= A′ = {2,10,12}.
     
    MathLover1, Jun 25, 2022
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  7. nycmathguy

    nycmathguy

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    Interesting idea. I hope I did the right thing by putting aside calculus to study college algebra. I am getting old and thus would like to learn calculus before age 60. I made it all the way to the product and quotient rules not knowing what a limit actually stands for.

    Limits is how we do calculus. Learning the derivative of functions with you without a solid understanding of limits is ridiculous. This in addition to DAILY corrections made me stop.
     
    nycmathguy, Jun 25, 2022
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